Activities

ChemEd X activities are student-centered resources intended to aid learning chemistry topics.

ChemEd X emphasizes inquiry-based activities where students pose questions (with direction from the teacher) and then attempt to discover the answers through scientific inquiry.

by Bob Worley
Wed, 11/13/2019 - 11:45

I sometimes wonder why some call precipitation reactions "double decomposition". I suppose two (double) salts are sort of splitting apart (decomposing?) and then reforming with other radicals. But a solvent (usually water) is necessary to achieve the desired effect. But is adding water to a salt really decomposition? 

Recent activity: 5 days 15 hours ago
by Stephanie O'Brien
Mon, 07/08/2019 - 14:19

I facilitate a working group of chemistry teachers in the New York area and we recently created our own activity surrounding the topic of oxidation. The goal of the probe was to force students to think about what the meaning of oxidation is, as well as to allow students to engage in the science and engineering practice of argumentation. This was an introductory lesson to my oxidation and reduction unit prior to students learning the terms oxidation and reduction.

Recent activity: 4 months 1 week ago
by Estelle Lebeau
Thu, 05/23/2019 - 09:00

Determination of Lewis Dot structures and visualization of the shapes of molecules using VSEPR theory is an example of an abstract concept that students often find difficult to learn. I have found it useful to have a single worksheet/packet that my students can add to as we cover Lewis dot structures, resonance, VSEPR shapes, polarity, and intermolecular forces.

Recent activity: 4 months 2 weeks ago
by Karen Perri
Sun, 04/07/2019 - 12:09

The author explains how she assigns roles for her students while completing laboratory work. The lab activity is designed to allow students to explore the use of indicators. It serves as an introduction to acids, bases and pH. 

Recent activity: 3 months 2 weeks ago
by Ben Meacham
Mon, 03/11/2019 - 12:18

Atomic theory is a common topic throughout any introductory chemistry course. It is likely that Rutherford’s gold foil experiment gets at least some attention in your course. I have used a simple activity that gives students an opportunity to replicate Rutherford’s experiment through an analogy experiment that may allow for easier conceptualization of the experiment itself and provide additional support for model development.

Comments: 9
Recent activity: 1 day 10 hours ago
by Ann Baxley
Mon, 01/28/2019 - 14:41

Trends related to placement of elements on the periodic table are often taught using diagrams in a textbook. Students often memorize trends, but to get a true grasp of their meaning and what causes certain patterns is best understood when students create their own models and discuss the patterns with others.

Comments: 3
Recent activity: 1 week 1 day ago
by Kaleb Underwood
Sat, 08/04/2018 - 12:37

A favorite demonstration is to boil water by lowering the pressure in a bell jar using a vacuum pump. Unfortunately, purchasing a bell jar, vacuum plate, and vacuum pump can run upwards of $1,000 which poses a hardship for many teachers. Here are two simple and inexpensive demonstrations of phase equilibrium and vapor pressure.

Comments: 2
Recent activity: 3 months 2 weeks ago
by Andrea Amato
Thu, 05/03/2018 - 22:12

Looking to change up your titration lab? Citric acid is very common in candy and other foods. Students will be engaged in using titration to find the amount of the acid in Mentos Now or other candy. Student and teacher documents are provided to help you use the activity with your own students.

Comments: 2
Recent activity: 2 weeks 13 hours ago
by Lauren Stewart
Fri, 04/27/2018 - 19:28

Radioactivity is a topic in chemistry that can be difficult to teach if you are looking for a hands-on, data-driven approach. Safety and cost concerns often prevent students from having an inquiry-based experience with the topic. In this post, I will share how I am able to give my students an authentic lab experience for them to determine there are three types of ionizing radiation without direct instruction.

Comments: 2
Recent activity: 3 months 2 weeks ago
by Kristen Drury
Tue, 02/20/2018 - 14:22

The unit of acids and bases is difficult for most students in Advanced Placement Chemistry. The variety of various calculations can be overwhelming. The Acid Base Speed Dating Activity engages students in completing a series of problems. Each student is assigned a specific solution and then determines their individual pH to complete their personal “Solution Biography.” Then the speed dating begins! For each date, the students need to find a specific match and determine their combined pH value. 

Comments: 2
Recent activity: 3 months 2 weeks ago