Chemistry

Mystery of Matter - Facilitating Discussion

I used the teacher guide for the Mystery of Matter video series to create worksheets for students to complete while watching the first two episodes. This can be used if you are leaving the video as a sub plan or if you want to assign the video as a homework assignment. It would also work as an assignment for absent students if you watch the video in class whether you use the worksheet with present students or just guide the discussion per the original teacher notes provided on the Mystery of Matter website. Using this format, you can create your own worksheets from the teacher guides of the other episodes as well.

The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements video series

If your not familiar with the video series "The Mystery of Matter, Search for the Elements" then I highly recommend their use as part of your curriculum. The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements is a PBS series about the amazing human story behind the Periodic Table. The videos, most of them 4-12 minutes long, draw on the interviews, re-enactments, animations and photographs that were shot and collected for the PBS series, with supplementary animations and images as needed. In all, the videos make up about three hours of programming. I shared several of the video clips with my high school students and they really seemed to enjoy them mentioning the reason was because the videos were done using actors to tell the stories and it was similar to watching a movie.

A nice quick and easy stoichiometry lab...

Stoichiometry lab

Students are told that they have to determine the amount of active ingredient in an antacid tablet. Then I ask them if they have any questions. First it starts with blank stares...then slowly the questions start coming. What exactly is the active ingredient? What does it react with? They are provided information that the active ingredient is baking soda.

ACS publishes Guidelines for Secondary School Laboratory Safety

Guidelines for Chemical Laboratory Safety in Secondary Schools

The ACS Committee on Chemical Safety has published new Guidelines for Chemical Laboratory Safety in Secondary Schools. This document is organized with the R.A.M.P. concept – Recognize the hazard, Assess the risk of the hazard, Minimize the risk of the hazard, and Prepare for emergencies. The online document includes two pages for each letter that could be printed and posted in the classroom to reinforce these principles of safety. The documents are provided to strengthen the safety practices of teachers and help them to promote a culture of safety that their students will take with them throughout their academic and professional careers.

A New Standard: Refine the Design of a Chemical System by Applying Engineering Principles

Teachers are accustomed to implementing new learning standards developed by state or national leaders. My state, Georgia, chose not to adopt the newest national standards. State leaders wrote the “Georgia Standards of Excellence” instead. Full implementation of the GSE begins in the 2017-2018 school year.

An easy copper electroplating demo for your redox unit

Simple Electroplating Demonstration

My IB seniors are just wrapping up our unit on electrochemistry and redox. This has always been a challenging topic within the IB curriculum. Admittedly, electrochemistry has not ever been my strong suit either, so this year I aimed to strengthen the unit with two additional demonstrations.

Material Science, Percent Comp and Copper

Soda Can in Copper(II)Chloride

Years ago, I took some wonderful material science workshops sponsored by ASM International(link is external). They did an amazing job of helping me add some more tools to my teaching tool kit. Materials are all around us and the workshop was a week long adventure into either creating a material science course or tying material science into existing curriculum. The chemistry of materials can easily be introduced into any curriculum.  

Especially JCE: November 2016

Nov 2016 issue of JCE

What surprised you most about class last week? What do you think was the muddiest point in class last week? These two questions are part of an article that caught my eye in the November 2016 issue of the Journal of Chemical Education—Surprises in the Muddy Waters of High-Enrollment Courses.