Activities

ChemEd X activities are student-centered resources intended to aid learning chemistry topics.

ChemEd X emphasizes inquiry-based activities where students pose questions (with direction from the teacher) and then attempt to discover the answers through scientific inquiry.

by Josh Kenney
Wed, 10/14/2020 - 09:08

In this activity, students learn about the mole. In section 1, students learn what a mole looks like for different substances. In section 2, students learn how the number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus determines the molar mass of an element by comparing individual isotopes in a PhET simulation..

Recent activity: 1 week 5 days ago
by Carrie Clippard
Wed, 10/07/2020 - 10:07

This activity allows students to see many different types of scales in order to become proficient at measuring and determining how many digits to record in any measurement, whether it be volumes, masses, lengths, etc.

Recent activity: 2 weeks 2 days ago
by Thomas Cox
Tue, 10/06/2020 - 17:20

Spectroscopy-based experiments are commonplace in college labs. This out-of-classroom activity post provides links to applications of spectroscopy in a diverse spectrum of disciplines and work fields.

Recent activity: 2 weeks 5 days ago
by Stephanie O'Brien
Sun, 10/04/2020 - 16:22

In this lab students are given a film canister, a quantity of Alka Seltzer of their own choosing and any materials available in the room to investigate factors that affect the rate of reaction. They work with their groups to create CER boards and then the class engages in a Glow and Grow session. Tips for using this activity in a virtual setting are offered as well. 

Recent activity: 3 weeks 59 min ago
by Josh Kenney
Wed, 09/16/2020 - 11:24

The author explains a virtual chemistry lab activity for use in a high school chemistry class. This activity is an excellent way to introduce measurements, significant figures, and the concept of density.

Recent activity: 1 month 1 week ago
by Lowell Thomson
Fri, 09/11/2020 - 11:21

Using the online simulation tool (Atomsmith Classroom Online) and the ADI framework students investigate the properties of gases, along with two gas laws. An ADI "whiteboard discussion" helps in getting students to really process what the results of experiments mean to us as chemists - and how this leads to expanding our understanding of matter. This activity lends itself to an online classroom.

Recent activity: 1 month 5 days ago
by Thomas Manning
Tue, 04/14/2020 - 14:21

This puzzle is developed by students and a faculty member of Valdosta State University during the Coronavirus pandemic that has brought the world to a standstill. It blends a novel approach to puzzles with an educational activity to serve as a learning tool for infectious diseases. While there is a strong strategic aspect to solving or completing the puzzle, it should also familiarize the participant with the names of infectious diseases and a few facts about each malady.

Recent activity: 6 months 2 weeks ago
by Bob Worley
Wed, 11/13/2019 - 11:45

Ever wonder why some call precipitation reactions "double decomposition". Perhaps (or perhaps not) two (double) salts are sort of splitting apart (decomposing?) and then reforming with other radicals. But a solvent (usually water) is necessary to achieve the desired effect. But is adding water to a salt really decomposition? 

Recent activity: 10 months 4 weeks ago
by Stephanie O'Brien
Mon, 07/08/2019 - 14:19

I facilitate a working group of chemistry teachers in the New York area and we recently created our own activity surrounding the topic of oxidation. The goal of the probe was to force students to think about what the meaning of oxidation is, as well as to allow students to engage in the science and engineering practice of argumentation. This was an introductory lesson to my oxidation and reduction unit prior to students learning the terms oxidation and reduction.

Recent activity: 1 year 3 months ago
by Estelle Lebeau
Thu, 05/23/2019 - 09:00

Determination of Lewis Dot structures and visualization of the shapes of molecules using VSEPR theory is an example of an abstract concept that students often find difficult to learn. I have found it useful to have a single worksheet/packet that my students can add to as we cover Lewis dot structures, resonance, VSEPR shapes, polarity, and intermolecular forces.

Recent activity: 1 year 3 months ago