Activities

ChemEd X activities are student-centered resources intended to aid learning chemistry topics.

ChemEd X emphasizes inquiry-based activities where students pose questions (with direction from the teacher) and then attempt to discover the answers through scientific inquiry.

by Kaleb Underwood
Sat, 08/04/2018 - 12:37

A favorite demonstration is to boil water by lowering the pressure in a bell jar using a vacuum pump. Unfortunately, purchasing a bell jar, vacuum plate, and vacuum pump can run upwards of $1,000 which poses a hardship for many teachers.

Comments: 2
Recent activity: 1 week 14 hours ago
by Andrea Amato
Thu, 05/03/2018 - 22:12

Looking to change up your titration lab? Citric acid is very common in candy and other foods. Students will be engaged in using titration to find the amount of the acid in Mentos Now or other candy. Student and teacher documents are provided to help you use the activity with your own students.

Recent activity: 3 months 1 week ago
by Lauren Stewart
Fri, 04/27/2018 - 19:28

Radioactivity is a topic in chemistry that can be difficult to teach if you are looking for a hands-on, data-driven approach. Safety and cost concerns often prevent students from having an inquiry-based experience with the topic. In this post, I will share how I am able to give my students an authentic lab experience for them to determine there are three types of ionizing radiation without direct instruction.

Recent activity: 3 months 3 weeks ago
by Kristen Drury
Tue, 02/20/2018 - 14:22

The unit of acids and bases is difficult for most students in Advanced Placement Chemistry. The variety of various calculations can be overwhelming. The Acid Base Speed Dating Activity engages students in completing a series of problems. Each student is assigned a specific solution and then determines their individual pH to complete their personal “Solution Biography.” Then the speed dating begins! For each date, the students need to find a specific match and determine their combined pH value. 

Comments: 2
Recent activity: 3 months 2 weeks ago
by Stephanie O'Brien
Thu, 02/15/2018 - 20:00

In an effort to align my lessons with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), I have tried to take the content I have traditionally taught, and shift the design to focus on student engagement with the science and engineering practices outlined in the standards. For the topic of heat transfer I re-packaged the ice melting blocks discrepant event as a NGSS investigative phenomena.

Recent activity: 6 months 5 days ago
by Bernadette Harkness
Sat, 09/30/2017 - 11:08

In this activity, students can look inside the model that resembles the atom and find information that reinforces what an isotope actually is. Furthermore, the quantitative data forces students to examine beliefs about different types of averages and what the numbers really mean. This takes a bit of effort to set up but is inexpensive and can be used year after year.

Comments: 1
Recent activity: 8 months 2 weeks ago
by Michael Morgan
Tue, 08/22/2017 - 15:30

My first experiment involves measuring the density of water. Each group of two kids is assigned a specific volume of water from 10 to 100 mLs on the tens. They simply measure the mass of an empty graduated cylinder and then add the water and find the mass again. Once they have their data they go around the room and find another group that has one of the volumes that they need and get the data from them and record their names. Once complete they generate a graph of the data and answer a few simple questions. The whole procedure can be completed in about 20 minutes.

Comments: 2
Recent activity: 11 months 2 weeks ago
by George Parris
Fri, 08/04/2017 - 11:32

A classroom activity to demonstrate the principles of chemical kinetics and equilibria and the utility of the mole concept is described here. The activity involved no hazardous materials or complex equipment and can be enjoyed and appreciated by general studies students as well as chemistry majors.

Recent activity: 11 months 3 weeks ago
by Deanna Cullen
Tue, 07/25/2017 - 12:03

Chad Hustings blogged this past school year about building his own Hoffman apparatus for each group of students. I have been using a Hoffman apparatus that had been purchased by my district before I began teaching there over 20 years ago to demonstrate electrolysis of water, but providing each student group with the ability to perform an electrolysis themselves is a powerful activity. I have used a different version of a homemade Hoffman apparatus, but after reading Chad's blog post, I decided to use a version close to his.  

Recent activity: 1 year 3 weeks ago
by Heidi Park
Sat, 07/08/2017 - 11:56

My first year teaching chemistry, I was looking for a soap-making lab or activity that I could run in my chemistry class with 25-30 students working at the same time. I usually do this activity right before spring break, as it provides enough time for the soap to harden and cure (high school students are impatient to use their soaps right away, which you should not do with cold process soap). I have used the activity at different points in the curriculum: during intermolecular forces, during acids and bases, and during stoichiometry. Although I know teachers who use soap making as a project during their stoichiometry unit, I chose to not emphasize the calculations as it would require more time than I have available. Simply making the soap easily fits in a 45-minute period.

Recent activity: 1 year 1 month ago