POGIL in the High School Chemistry Class: Objectives, Practices, and Outcomes

All too often teachers use POGIL activities as worksheets when the teacher is absent, busy work to review a topic, or handouts for homework. However, using the POGIL activities in this manner does not allow the students to reap all the benefits of the activity. This article is designed to give you a glimpse into what the POGIL process can do for you.

JCE 95.04 April 2018 Issue Highlights

Placing Chemistry into a World Context

The April 2018 issue of the Journal of Chemical Education is now available online to subscribers. Topics featured in this issue include: service-learning, safety, investigating student understanding of solutions, environmental chemistry, green chemistry, waste management, acid-base chemistry, natural products, materials science, activities and laboratory investigations, teaching resources, diving into the archives: marine chemistry.

Get Your POGIL on This Summer

If you have never attended an official Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) training, you may consider doing so this summer. Many educators mention they have used POGIL activities. The POGIL pedagogy is not simply students completing worksheets. It requires training to implement it in order to achieve the desired effects of developing students process skills along with providing the opportunity for students to self discover content through collaborative roles.

Be Part of a Study of Three-Dimensional Assessments Developed by AAAS Project 2061

Consider helping the AAAS Project 2061 pilot their newly developed assessment tasks that measure students' ability to use the three dimensions outlined by the Next Generation Science Standards - science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas related to energy. Elementary, middle, and high school science teachers and college/university professors teaching in the U.S. that have students in 4th through 12th grade or undergraduate students and are willing to pilot these assessment tasks with their students are invited to register.

March Madness with the Periodic Table

I ran a multi-day poll on Twitter that was designed to be a fun way to determine the “best” element on the periodic table. I’m sharing about the poll here on ChemEdX in case others might want to try something similar in their classrooms. The poll was run tournament-style, fashioned after NCAA Basketball’s March Madness. The event was called #MarchMatterMadness. Just like basketball’s March Madness tournament, four different “regions” were set up, and each element was seeded into brackets according to atomic number.