ACCT Evaluation team

Jim Hammerman

James K.L. Hammerman, Ed.D. (Jim) is Co-Director of the STEM Education Evaluation Center () at TERC. Dr. Hammerman’s research and evaluation work builds on more than 30 years of experience in education, many spent as a teacher, teacher educator, and curriculum developer.

Since joining TERC in 2001, Jim has served as principal investigator, lead evaluator, or senior researcher on more than two dozen externally funded research and evaluation projects, focusing on pedagogical and institutional change, mathematics education, environmental education, computing education, and data and statistics education. He is principal investigator on an NSF-funded evaluation of a mathematics teacher professional development program, and co-PI on a project that is developing software tools for blind and visually impaired students to engage in astronomy data collection and analysis. Jim currently leads external evaluations for several projects, including an immersive computer environment for conducting experiments to explore causality and ecology, a state-wide initiative to engage rural youth in computing through programming an online game, and an effort to improve pedagogy among university STEM faculty.

Jim has designed, implemented, and researched mathematics and science education curricula and professional development programs, as well as technology tools that support inquiry-oriented learning. He has taught students at levels ranging from kindergarten through graduate school, including methods courses for researchers. Jim is especially interested in adult developmental differences in professional development, data and statistics learning, online and software tools that support exploration, and supporting deeper learning and more reflective practice in professional communities.

Jim earned his Ed.D (2002) in Learning and Teaching from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Eric Hochberg

Eric Hochberg conducts research and evaluation in STEM education. His primary interests are at the intersection of instruction and education policy, with a particular focus on mathematics professional development and the roles of policy and school organizations in supporting teaching and learning.

Eric’s research and evaluation work draws on professional experience as an elementary school teacher and an academic background in education policy. At TERC, Eric leads the evaluation of a five-year NSF-funded micro-credentialing program to support secondary mathematics and science teachers’ professional growth and their students’ learning, and serves as an evaluator on a range of other projects. In addition, he is part of a research team studying elementary student and teacher engagement with the Common Core State Standards Initiative’s Standards for Mathematical Practice.

Eric earned his Ph.D. in Education Policy from the University of Pennsylvania.

Audrey Martinez-Gudapakkam