Education

JCE 96.05 May 2019 Issue Highlights

Encouraging Student Learning and Success

The May 2019 issue of the Journal of Chemical Education is now available to subscribers. Topics featured in this issue include: microscale precipitation chemistry; making science personal; chemical escape rooms; teaching organic chemistry; peer learning; laboratory assessment; examining cognitive load; inquiry activities; exploring infrared spectroscopy; laboratory experiments; teaching resources; shaking the archives: the blue bottle experiment.

Welcome from Two Year College Editor

My name is Scott Donnelly, editor for the Two Year College (TYC) component of ChemEd Xchange. This is my first of what likely will be many contributions over the coming years. Since this is my inaugural post as the TYC editor perhaps I should let you all know a bit about myself and my educational philosophy.

JCE 96.04 April 2019 Issue Highlights

Producing Tomorrow’s Adaptable Chemist

The April 2019 issue of the Journal of Chemical Education is now available to subscribers. Topics featured in this issue include: Machine Learning; Revised International System of Units; Examining Chemical Information Literacy; Flipped Teaching; Chemistry and Business; Learning about Safety; Researched-Based Courses; Effective Teaching Resources; Learning through Play; Exploring Water Treatment; Green Chemistry Laboratories; Experiments with NMR Spectroscopy; Investigating Kinetics; Computer-Based Experiences; From the Archive: Chemists Celebrate Earth Week 2019—Take Note: The Chemistry of Paper.

Video-Enhanced Automatically-Graded Web-Based Pre-Lab Tutorials

In our freshman Chemistry laboratory course at Nicholls State University, tutorials (with embedded quizzes) are used as pre-lab assignments. The text and graphical information provide a sufficient basis to answer all the questions, but YouTube videos are embedded for students who may need additional help. The tutorials could be easily adapted for flipped instruction in high school and college lecture courses.

Special Knowledge That Only Teachers Have

Developing PCK requires a certain level of subject matter knowledge, and teachers have a different understanding of subject matter than a person who specializes in that same field. A chemistry teacher and a ‘practicing’ chemist both have subject matter knowledge in chemistry; however, the knowledge is applied differently.