high school chemistry

Boiling Water, Heating Curves, and Can Crushes

In an effort to better understand my high school students' knowledge of what is happening during phase changes, heating curve calculations, and the ever popular can crush demo, I run them through a series of activities. First, I ask my students "What Temperature Does Water Boil At?"

Time required: 

1.5 days to do all the activities including lecture on heating curve calculations.

LED lights and the Periodic Table

Every LED light has a "band gap". Electrons are pushed into an empty orbital which is negative and then the positive end of the circuit attracts the electrons. As they go down in energy through the band gap, they emit light. The larger the band gap, the more energy, the smaller the wavelength and the closer to the "blue" end of the spectrum. So, the key is to try to control the band gap and thus control the color of light. 

Developing a High School Food Chemistry Elective

Students work in the kitchen/lab

Food chemistry is an interesting and fun class for students. Read the article for some suggestions about resources along with an outline of a unit developed around water in cooking. 

Julia Winter - Teacher & CEO

Winter & Cullen at ACS SanDiego

Julia Winter is the 2016 Conant Award winner. She is a veteran chemistry teacher from Michigan. You can watch a video interview recorded March 2016.

JCE 94.02 February 2017 Issue Highlights

Journal of Chemical Education February 2017 Cover

Fostering Creativity in Chemistry

The February 2017 online issue of the Journal of Chemical Education is now available to subscribers. Topics featured include: surface chemistry; chemical identity thinking; conceptual understanding; communicating science to the general public; activities and labs linking chemistry and art; history and chemistry; early access to research; technology as instructional support; synthesis laboratories; from the archives: bottle chemistry.

Especially JCE: February 2017

Erica Jacobsen shares highlights from the February 2017 issue of the Journal of Chemical Education that are of special interest to high school chemistry teachers.

Implementing the Claim, Evidence, Reasoning Framework in the Chemistry Classroom

Claims, Evidence & Reasoning example

For me, the first step toward teaching my students how to critically think about how they structured an argument or explanation was to implement the Claim, Evidence, Reasoning (CER) framework. While the premise behind CER isn’t anything new to the way science teachers already think, it provides an entirely different approach toward how students connect their experiences and previously learned content into something that is much more reflective of being scientifically literate.