Videos

ChemEd X Subscribers enjoy access to a large collection of videos and the associated still images.

The ChemEd X video collection includes modernized versions of the Chemistry Comes Alive! video collection. In addition to this award-winning collection, contributors continue to create some very interesting video.

Note: We are currently updating the ChemEd X video collection. While we do, playing ChemEd X video on Internet Explorer has issues. We recommend that you use Google Chrome or Firefox until these issues are resolved. We apologize for the inconvenience and thank you for your patience.

by ChemEd X
Fri, 11/29/2013 - 17:24
Recent activity: 10 months 4 weeks ago
by ChemEd X
Fri, 11/29/2013 - 17:24
Recent activity: 10 months 4 weeks ago
by ChemEd X
Fri, 11/29/2013 - 17:24
Recent activity: 10 months 4 weeks ago
by ChemEd X
Fri, 11/29/2013 - 17:24
Recent activity: 10 months 4 weeks ago
by ChemEd X
Fri, 11/29/2013 - 17:24
Recent activity: 10 months 4 weeks ago
by ChemEd X
Fri, 11/29/2013 - 17:24

When red-orange mercury(II) Iodide (HgI2) is heated, it undergoes a phase transition at 126°C to a pale yellow form. As the heated sample cools, it gradually returns to the original red-orange color.

Recent activity: 10 months 4 weeks ago
by ChemEd X
Fri, 11/29/2013 - 17:24

When red-orange mercury(II) Iodide (HgI2) is heated, it undergoes a phase transition at 126°C to a pale yellow form. As the heated sample cools, it gradually returns to the original red-orange color.

Recent activity: 10 months 4 weeks ago
by ChemEd X
Fri, 11/29/2013 - 17:24

When a piece of metal wire spelling the letters ICE is pulled apart, it deforms. When the wire is placed in hot water, it "remembers" its original shape, once again forming the letters ICE. (The memory metal used in this demonstration was provided by the Institute for Chemical Education.) A simulation of the processes at the atomic level is shown.

Recent activity: 10 months 4 weeks ago
by ChemEd X
Fri, 11/29/2013 - 17:24

When a piece of metal wire spelling the letters ICE is pulled apart, it deforms. When the wire is placed in hot water, it "remembers" its original shape, once again forming the letters ICE. (The memory metal used in this demonstration was provided by the Institute for Chemical Education.) A simulation of the processes at the atomic level is shown.

Recent activity: 10 months 4 weeks ago
by ChemEd X
Fri, 11/29/2013 - 17:24
Recent activity: 10 months 4 weeks ago