Picks

ChemEd X contributors and staff members are continually coming across items of interest that they feel others may wish to know about. Picks include, but need not be limited to, books, magazines, journals, articles, apps—most anything that has a link to it can qualify.

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by Hal Harris
Thu, 05/16/2013 - 15:10

One could argue that the technological triumphs embodied in our robotic explorations of Mars far exceed those that put men on the moon.  Missing, however, is the drama of putting human life at risk, and the ease with which our imagination can put us in the shoes of the explorer. That is not to say that there is not a human element.

Recent activity: 3 years 9 months ago
by Hal Harris
Sat, 05/04/2013 - 23:40

Universities should be and are expected to be sources of truthful and unbiased information about controversial subjects, especially in the sciences.  Unfortunately, that is not always the case.

Comments: 1
Recent activity: 3 years 9 months ago
by Hal Harris
Tue, 04/30/2013 - 21:09

Peter Hoffman is a physicist and materials scientist, and he brings those perspectives and sensibilities to the description of how life converts chemical energy into order and motion.  The "Ratchet" in the title is Feynman's Ratchet, a gedanken experiment described in Feynman's "Lectures on Physics" and reminiscent of Maxwell's Demon.

Recent activity: 3 years 10 months ago
by Doug Ragan
Tue, 04/16/2013 - 12:10

Gas Laws HD Lite is a free iOS app that allows students to discover the relationship of Boyle’s Law and Charles Law.

Comments: 3
Recent activity: 3 years 4 months ago
by Doug Ragan
Fri, 04/12/2013 - 17:05

iGasLaw is a free iOS app that provides useful tools for studying properties of gases and gas laws.

Comments: 3
Recent activity: 3 years 3 months ago
by Hal Harris
Mon, 01/28/2013 - 17:26

Samuel Arbesman, a mathematician and network scientist, uses the idea a half-life as an analogy for the changes in human knowledge that science brings. He discusses both the changing rate at which new science is done and the speed at which old results are replaced by newer ones. The analogy is far from perfect, but it emphasizes some critically important aspects of the processes of science.

Recent activity: 4 years 1 month ago
by Hal Harris
Tue, 11/20/2012 - 15:02

The respected education reformer Diane Ravitch, previously one of the major architects and proponents of No Child Left Behind, has not only taken a new tack, but reversed course. With her 2011 book, she became a leading voice critical of the Obama-Duncan version, Race to the Top. This essay by David Denby describes her evolution.

Recent activity: 4 years 1 month ago
by Hal Harris
Mon, 11/05/2012 - 11:19

New York Times blogger Nate Silver demonstrates how probability and statistical thinking can be used to analyze practical problems in our society. A lively, practical, and informative book!

Comments: 1
Recent activity: 4 years 3 months ago
by Hal Harris
Fri, 10/19/2012 - 14:53

This is a lively collection of essays about some of the great (mostly English, but not entirely so) chemists of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It brings to life many great names of our science.

Recent activity: 4 years 3 months ago
by Jon Holmes
Tue, 10/09/2012 - 12:53

Alexandra W. Logue, executive vice chancellor and provost of the City University of New York, reminds us that the ideas and tools we are finally getting around to using have been around for a while.

Recent activity: 4 years 4 months ago