activity

Nanopatterning with Lithography

In this Activity, students learn the general principles of serial and parallel nanofabrication techniques. Students use nylon spheres, contact paper, and talcum powder to form patterns. Using this macroscale analogy, students explore the parallel fabrication technique known as nanosphere lithography.

Calories - Who's Counting?

In this Activity, students determine how many calories are released per gram when marshmallows and cashews burn and then compare the quantity of energy available from carbohydrates versus fats. Students burn the food items beneath a metal soft drink can containing water and measure the resulting change in temperature of the water.

A Kool Reaction from the Fine Print

In this Activity, students gain an understanding of the importance of reading reagent labels both in chemistry class and on consumer products. Students explore the chemistry behind the directive on a package of Kool-Aid "Do not store in a metal container". The Activity illustrates properties of acids and metals.

Color My Nanoworld

This Activity introduces students to the unique properties of nanoscale materials through exploration of size-dependent optical properties of gold nanoparticles. Students first prepare a solution of gold nanoparticles. They then investigate the solution’s use as an electrolyte sensor by adding a non-electrolyte and a strong electrolyte, and observing any resulting color changes.

A Magnetic Meal

In this Activity, students make slurries of breakfast cereal and water and use a magnetic wand to collect elemental iron filings that are present in some cereals. They determine the mass of iron collected and then calculate the "recommended daily allowance" (RDA) in each cereal. An extension uses qualitative tests to confirm that the material collected is actually iron.

Cooking Up Colors from Plants, Fabric, and Metal

In this Activity, students dye fabric squares with two plant dyes: aqueous extracts of tea leaves and of marigold flowers. They investigate how the addition of iron to a dye bath affects the resulting color and fastness of the dyed fabrics and observe that the type of fabric affects the results. This Activity can accompany a discussion of the impressive array of chemicals produced by plants.

Garbage Juice: Waste Management and Leachate Generation

In this Activity, students use multi-colored breakfast cereal and liquid to model the concepts of leachate and leaching from municipal solid waste disposed of in a landfill. Students create a modern landfill model with the same material. This environmental chemistry Activity can be used to complement a celebration of Earth Day.

More Than Meets the Eye: Nonvisual Observations in Chemistry

In this Activity, a blindfolded student, with another student as an assistant, observes the reaction between baking soda and cream of tartar in solution in a plastic bag. The Activity could be used at the start of a chemistry course to emphasize the importance of using all appropriate senses to make observations.

The Effects of Temperature on Lightsticks

In this Activity, students observe and compare the behavior of three lightsticks that are exposed to three different temperature ranges (cold, room temperature, and hot). The Activity could be used early in the school year to give students practice in making detailed observations and devising reasonable explanations for those observations. It illustrates the use of qualitative vs.

An After-Dinner Trick

In this Activity, students investigate a classic chemistry demonstration that uses the phenomenon of freezing-point depression to lift an ice cube out of a glass of water with a thread. They first test how adding salt, pepper, cream, and sugar to cold water affects the temperature.