activity

What's Gluep? Characterizing a Cross-Linked Polymer

In this Activity, students make a cross-linked polymer called "gluep" using white glue and borax solution. They then investigate its properties, and "un-gluep" and "re-gluep" it using vinegar and baking soda. This Activity can be used in discussions of polymers or properties of liquids and solids. It demonstrates the composition and alternative use of a common household product.

LEDs Are Diodes

In this Activity, students compare incandescent bulbs and LEDs powered by dc and ac voltage sources. They use circuits made from cut-up holiday light strands, with some of the incandescent bulbs replaced with LEDs. The diode nature of LEDs is demonstrated, as well as the energy associated with different wavelengths of light.

Out of Thin Air: Exploring Phase Changes

This Activity illustrates sublimation/deposition with dichlorobenzene (mothballs) and evaporation/condensation with water. This Activity could be used to introduce the phases of matter and phase changes at both the macroscopic and microscopic levels.

CD Light: An Introduction to Spectroscopy

In this Activity, students use a CD to build a simple spectroscope. They use it to investigate how different colors of light interact with colored matter. This qualitative Activity could be used as a general introduction to spectroscopy and the concepts of complementary colors and absorbance.

Tick Tock, a Vitamin C Clock

In this Activity, students make a chemical clock using chemicals found in the supermarket: vitamin C tablets, tincture of iodine (2%), hydrogen peroxide (3%), and liquid laundry starch. They investigate what happens to the speed of the clock when the reactant solutions are made more or less dilute.

Liver and Onions: DNA Extraction from Animal and Plant Tissues

In this Activity, students extract DNA from liver and onion cells, and precipitate the DNA. The Activity fits well with a discussion of nucleic acids, hydrogen bonding, genetic coding, and heredity. DNA extraction can also be used in conjunction with a discussion of polymers and their properties.

Lego Stoichiometry

In this Activity, students use building-block car kits to explore stoichiometry in a concrete manner. They determine the relationship between the number and mass of each required car component (the pieces in the kit) and the mass of the final product (the completed car). This Activity works well as either an introduction or review of stoichiometry.