Picks

ChemEd X contributors and staff members are continually coming across items of interest that they feel others may wish to know about. Picks include, but need not be limited to, books, magazines, journals, articles, apps—most anything that has a link to it can qualify.

Many Picks can be purchased from Amazon. Using the Amazon links on those pages help to support ChemEd X.

by Hal Harris
Sat, 03/02/2002 - 01:00

This book is not politically correct, in an era in which school science experiments have been tamed to the point that there is little possibility that the teacher will kill or maim him/herself.

Recent activity: 7 years 7 months ago
by Hal Harris
Fri, 03/01/2002 - 00:00

Those of us who were fans of the old "Amateur Scientist" column of Scientific American will enjoy this collection of projects that look to be fun to build and to play with. These are all things that the author has invented or adapted for a Saturday Science Club for kids near his home in Guildford, UK.

Recent activity: 7 years 7 months ago
by Hal Harris
Sat, 02/02/2002 - 01:00

Barry Commoner argues that the central "dogma" of genetic engineering, that DNA alone controls protein synthesis in a one-to-one correspondence between genes and proteins, is highly questionable.

Recent activity: 4 months 4 weeks ago
by Hal Harris
Fri, 02/01/2002 - 00:00

I first wrote about the controversial thesis of this book back in January of 2000, when my "Pick" was an article about David Hockney by Lawrence Wechler in the New Yorker. With the publication of this very attractive, large-format book, you can look for yourself at the evidence that he argues shows that many of the great master painters secretly used optical devices to help produce their work.

Recent activity: 6 years 9 months ago
by Hal Harris
Wed, 01/02/2002 - 01:00

Ice cores, bored through thousands of feet of stable glacial ice in Greenland, have proved to be our best record of global climate over more than a hundred thousand years.

Recent activity: 7 years 7 months ago
by Hal Harris
Tue, 01/01/2002 - 00:00

Sue Hubbell has written beautifully about her experiences as a beekeeper in rural Missouri. For example, I recommend her "Broadsides from the Other Orders and "A Country Year".

Recent activity: 7 years 7 months ago
by Hal Harris
Sat, 12/01/2001 - 00:00

One of the goals of a course I teach in our Honors College is to provide non-science majors with the tools they need to differentiate authentic science from material that has merely been provided a "scientific" dressing. Physicist Robert Ehrlich has provided nine case studies that are ideal for this purpose. Do more guns in the hands of citizens decrease crime? Is AIDS really caused by HIV?

Recent activity: 7 years 7 months ago
by Hal Harris
Fri, 11/02/2001 - 01:00

No, phosphorus did not jump to a new position in the periodic table - it is still element number 15.

Recent activity: 7 years 7 months ago
by Hal Harris
Thu, 11/01/2001 - 00:00

Malcolm Gladwell has done it again. This article is very much in the spirit of the books by Henry Petroski, who has written about the engineering hidden in ordinary objects such as paperclips and pencils.

Recent activity: 7 years 7 months ago
by Hal Harris
Mon, 10/01/2001 - 01:00

Professor James Collman of Stanford University has provided an excellent resource for all of us who try to help our students and the general public to discriminate between valid science and the bogus "scientific" claims that pervade television, the Internet, the grocery store, and especially the "health food" store.

Recent activity: 7 years 7 months ago