assessment

Hidden Messages in Chemistry Assessments

The idea of a “curriculum emphasis” is that how we teach, including the ways that text books are written and how we write assessments, sends hidden messages to students about what the purposes of science are and are not, and what are the roles of teachers and students in learning science, and who should or should not be included in science. 

Assessing the Assessors

A lot of time is spent assessing students but how much time is spent assessing ourselves and our peers? Some faculty take departmental evaluations seriously and professionally while others prefer not to for a variety of reasons. What happens when a faculty member introduces evaluation guidelines into a department that had none previously? Read and find out.

Ungrading: What is it and why should we use it?

Ungrading has long been associated with the idea of purposefully eliminating or minimizing the use of points or letters to assess student work. The focus of ungrading is to provide extensive feedback to students and then jointly (students and instructors) come to a consensus as to what the grade should be. This post addresses what ungrading is and why do it.

SBG Hacks: Lab Reports

As a chemistry teacher considering the switch to standards-based grading, you might be wondering how lab reports work in a system that is not based on points. With lab reports, you just need to decide whether you are grading chemistry content skills, scientific communication skills, or both.

SBG Hacks: Homework

As teachers, we know how important it is for students to practice what they are learning and we are ever aware of the limited class time we have to provide those opportunities. We also know that our students have a full schedule of classes, are involved in extracurricular activities, work after-school jobs and may not have a strong support system and structure at home. That leaves us with the difficult question of “what do we do about homework?”