Science Literacy

COVID-19: Data vs Evidence

The practice and the promulgation of science, its ideas, and knowledge acquired about how the biotic and abiotic world works depend significantly on what words are chosen to communicate scientific ideas, methods, thought, and information. This blog post looks at how a recently published NY Times article on the growing evidence that the SARS-CoV-2 virus can be transmitted via the air can be used in the classroom to promote discussion and challenge students to think about the distinction between data and evidence. If applicable, it could be expanded to also include the difference between opinion and information, if desired.

Peer Editing

One aspect of Argument Driven Inquiry that has not been discussed here is the peer editing piece. I have succesfully tried it out with my own students.

 

ACS Discoveries! - Making Science More Accessible

The American Chemical Society is offering a new service in hopes of making science more accessible to the public. Each week they issue a short collection of science articles, written in an interesting and engaging style, that you might use with your students to help them make connections between the curriculum and their own lives. The service is called Discoveries!, and it is free.

Literacy Stations in the Chemistry Classroom

Stephanie O'Brien took a tip from the elementary school teachers and created literacy stations to help increase the amount of reading and writing in her classroom. Literacy centers support students by arming them with the tools to utilize when examining text documents, charts, graphs, pictures etc. to take the content and make it comprehensible. She provides examples of literacy centers she uses in her classroom.

Dance Your Final Project

As part of advocating science literacy in my classroom, I have my 10th grade Honors Chemistry students dance their first semester final. This Dance Your Final semester final is to force students to actually read real, published scientific research; have a group final; eliminate test anxiety; and help students have fun with the content. Truly, of all assignments I give during the school year, this is the one that students say they sweat the hardest on, enjoy the most, and are the most proud of their work.