Picks

ChemEd X contributors and staff members are continually coming across items of interest that they feel others may wish to know about. Picks include, but need not be limited to, books, magazines, journals, articles, apps—most anything that has a link to it can qualify.

Many Picks can be purchased from Amazon. Using the Amazon links on those pages help to support ChemEd X.

by Hal Harris
Mon, 05/01/2000 - 01:00

A year or so ago, I greatly enjoyed reading another book by Lisa Jardine, "Worldly Goods: A New History of the Renaissance", but I couldn't justify it for "Hal's Picks" because it didn't have much scientific content. When I heard about "Ingenious Pursuits", I bought it from a book club and read it right away.

Recent activity: 7 years 4 months ago
by Hal Harris
Sun, 04/02/2000 - 01:00

In 1963, Richard Feynmann gave three lectures at the University of Washington. This short book (only 133 pages) is a transcript of those talks. The lectures were not really physics, but were a very informal (virtually extemporaneous) view of what the results of modern physics means to everyman.

Recent activity: 7 years 4 months ago
by Hal Harris
Sat, 04/01/2000 - 00:00

Lieb and Yngvason describe in this article how the concept of entropy can be explained without resorting to heat engines or statistical mechanics, and without even the a priori imposition of temperature.

Recent activity: 7 years 4 months ago
by Hal Harris
Wed, 03/01/2000 - 00:00

For anyone who has tried unsuccessfully (like me) to find familiar stars in well-known constellations through a telescope, the competition that David Freedman describes sounds impossible. The "sport" is to see how many of the 110 celestial objects in the Messier catalog you can locate and identify during a single night of observation.

Recent activity: 7 years 4 months ago
by Hal Harris
Thu, 02/03/2000 - 02:00

I'm not a big fan of science fiction. I find "real" science to be generally more interesting; the fictionalized kind usually requires me to pretend that the universe is far different than what I believe to be the case. In fiction, travel between planets (or even solar systems) is accomplished quite easily, by suspension of the speed limit imposed by relativity.

Recent activity: 7 years 4 months ago
by Hal Harris
Wed, 02/02/2000 - 01:00

These authors address a few of the same questions as do Karukstis and Van Hecke, but they take aim at a somewhat more technically sophisticated audience; instead of trying to enhance chemical education near the introductory level, they are speaking to practicing chemists, some of whom may also be teachers.

Recent activity: 7 years 4 months ago
by Hal Harris
Tue, 02/01/2000 - 00:00

Kerry Karukstis and Gerry Van Hecke teach undergraduate chemistry at Harvey Mudd College (my alma mater), and Gerry was a student there at the same time I was (sometime in the previous millennium). They have collaborated on a very useful and engaging supplementary book for introductory and organic chemistry.

Recent activity: 7 years 4 months ago
by Hal Harris
Sun, 01/02/2000 - 01:00

Artist David Hockney has a theory that some of the "old master" portrait painters secretly used cameras(!) to help them sketch their subjects. No, he's not saying that they had Polaroids or film. However, the camera obscura was available in the early 18th century, and the more practical camera lucida was invented in 1807. Did the great artists use these devices?

Recent activity: 7 years 4 months ago
by Hal Harris
Sat, 01/01/2000 - 00:00

The date for this selection should be listed as January, 02000, in keeping with the long view of history, science, technology, and environment that the Long Now Foundation wants to foster.

Recent activity: 7 years 4 months ago
by Hal Harris
Wed, 12/01/1999 - 00:00

In about 1637, a French mathematical genius named Pierre de Fermat wrote in the margin of his copy of Arithmetica by Pythagorus, that he could prove that there were no solutions to the simple variation on Pythagorus' Theorem, az + bz = czwhen a, b, and c are integers and z is larger than two.

Recent activity: 7 years 4 months ago