May 2018 Xchange

In this May newsletter, we are highlighting a few of the fantastic resources published by ChemEd X over the past month. Beginning with this issue we will be revisiting popular posts previously published that are related to one or more of the items we highlight in each issue of Xchange. Also, we are rolling out our on our ChemEd X Vimeo channel.

Cheers!

Deanna Cullen

     

Now that the 2018 administration of the AP Chemistry Exam is in the books, AP Chemistry teachers have an opportunity to reflect on the year and prepare for next year. Kaleb Underwood suggests that all AP teachers take the time to fully answer every released FRQ in order to gain a deeper understanding and “feel” of the test. He offers his draft answers to the 2018 FRQs, along with his prediction of how points will be awarded.

     

The basic premise of authentic assessment is to create more opportunities for students to perform tasks that demonstrate meaningful application of essential knowledge and skills. Doing so involves going beyond, or even potentially replacing, traditional summative assessments at the end of each unit. Read the article for more information and examples of how you might add authentic assessment to your curriculum.

     

Award winning teacher, Roxie Allen, shares her journey with Modeling InstructionTM. She identifies training opportunities available around the country, including a BCCE pre-conference workshop at Notre Dame. For readers unfamiliar with Modeling InstructionTM, there are several short workshops scheduled during BCCE to get your feet wet.

     

Finding chemistry in the real world always engages students. Have you seen the Wack-A-Pack™ valentine balloons? The author shares how you might use the balloons in an activity incorporating acid/base chemistry, gas laws and reactions. Student and teacher documents are available to help you try this with your own students.

     

Looking to change up your titration lab? Citric acid is very common in candy and other foods. Students will be engaged in using titration to find the amount of the acid in Mentos Now or other candy. Student and teacher documents are provided to help you use the activity with your own students.

     

- Revisited

This activity was submitted in response to a 2016 ChemEd X Call for Contributions soliciting input regarding the big ideas being put forth by organizations like AP. The author shares a lab activity that relies on connections - between stoichiometry, esterification, equilibrium, kinetics, titrations and uncertainty of calculations. He also shares the resources he created.

     

Erica Jacobsen regularly highlights JCE articles that are of special interest to high school teachers. This month, she focuses on an article, “Encouraging the Art of Communicating Science to Non-experts with Don’t Be Such a Scientist”, that outlines how educators, scientists and chemists can communicate with the general public to challenge misperceptions about science and scientists. If you would like to explore the whole issue in more depth, check out Mary Saecker's.

     

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