books

The Hindenburg

I have always been intrigued by the story of the Hindenburg, the iconic airship that caught fire on May 6, 1937. The accident killed 35 of the 100 passengers and crewmembers on board. As a chemistry teacher, I discuss this from a chemical standpoint and the fact that the airship was filled with hydrogen, a flammable gas, rather than helium, a non-flammable gas, as today’s modern airships are.

JCE 93.03 March 2016 Issue Highlights

​Chemical Information Special Issue 

The March 2016 issue of the Journal of Chemical Education is now available online to subscribers. The entire issue is devoted to topics on various aspects of chemical information and information literacy: chemical education research on information literacy; chemical information literacy for undergraduates; chemical information literacy for graduate students; prototypes and best practices; discovery.

Guidelines On Determining And Reporting Significant Figures In Chemical Measurements

A measured value has little or no true meaning and thus, it is useless, unless the figures (digits) in that value were deemed to be significant and the significant figures were properly determined and reported. Deciding the appropriate number of significant figures for the reporting of numerical data is not an obvious or easy task.

TA Handbook

A valuable resource for helping to train teaching assistants, the TA Handbook is available for download at JCE ChemEd X as premium content for ChemEd X subscribers. It is no longer available in print.