Picks

ChemEd X contributors and staff members are continually coming across items of interest that they feel others may wish to know about. Picks include, but need not be limited to, books, magazines, journals, articles, apps—most anything that has a link to it can qualify.

Many Picks can be purchased from Amazon. Using the Amazon links on those pages help to support ChemEd X.

by Hal Harris
Sat, 11/01/1997 - 00:00

Nearly everyone who teaches introductory chemistry courses, whether in secondary schools or in universities, makes the connection between the periodic table and electronic configurations. Eric Scerri provides history and science that can make the discussion of that topic both more historically and scientifically accurate.

Recent activity: 6 years 1 week ago
by Hal Harris
Thu, 10/02/1997 - 02:00

Generally speaking, if you skipped every book with the word "weird" in the title, you wouldn't be missing much. This is an exception. Michael Shermer teaches the history of science at Occidental College in Eagle Rock, California and, as Editor of Skeptic Magazine, is a prominent and eloquent proponent of the skeptical viewpoint.

Recent activity: 6 years 1 week ago
by Hal Harris
Wed, 10/01/1997 - 01:00

Did you know that the so-called "Spanish" influenza epidemic of 1918 killed more Americans in three months than the number who died in the First World War, the Second World War, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War - combined? Most people don't.

Recent activity: 6 years 1 week ago
by Hal Harris
Mon, 09/01/1997 - 01:00

Heat a ball of lime in a hydrogen-oxygen flame, and what do you get? Limelight! This very intense light source was used for lighting plays (hence the modern usage of the word), but it also was the source for the record distance, for a time, over which man-made light was observed.

Recent activity: 6 years 1 week ago
by Hal Harris
Fri, 08/01/1997 - 01:00

It's not too late to do some recreational reading this summer. "Catalyst" is an enjoyable, light read, especially for chemists. How often do you find a novel that includes catalysis, NMR, mass spectrometry, TLC, some scientific misconduct, and a little sex?

Recent activity: 6 years 1 week ago
by Hal Harris
Tue, 07/01/1997 - 01:00

Most of the chemistry professors and teachers with whom I am acquainted are fairly pleased with the national trend toward putting more computers in school, college, and university classrooms.

Recent activity: 6 years 1 week ago
by Hal Harris
Sun, 06/01/1997 - 01:00

I like almost everything about this book, except the title. I don't believe that teachers of science should be "explaining" science in their classrooms and, fortunately, the authors of "Explaining Science" don't, either.

Recent activity: 6 years 1 week ago
by Hal Harris
Fri, 05/02/1997 - 02:00

The rematch between world chess champion Garry Kasparov and IBM's "Deep Blue" (and a team of programmers) provides the focus for a discussion of the meaning of intelligence, humanity, and consciousness.

Recent activity: 6 years 1 week ago
by Hal Harris
Thu, 05/01/1997 - 01:00

Bernd Heinrich is one of my favorite writers about nature, and especially insects. I discovered his "Bumblebee Economics" (Harvard University Press paperback) a number of years ago, and used it in a course for non-science majors that I taught in our Honors College.

Recent activity: 6 years 1 week ago
by Hal Harris
Wed, 04/02/1997 - 01:00

The "river" to which Dawkins refers in the title of this little (172 page) book is the river of digital genetic information that connects us to our human ancestors and to the rest of life on our planet. I find this metaphor to be an extremely provocative one, and I suspect that it would appeal to many of our computer-addicted students.

Recent activity: 6 years 1 week ago