Picks

ChemEd X contributors and staff members are continually coming across items of interest that they feel others may wish to know about. Picks include, but need not be limited to, books, magazines, journals, articles, apps—most anything that has a link to it can qualify.

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by Hal Harris
Tue, 10/01/2002 - 01:00

In 1900, David Hilbert gave an address to the International Congress of Mathematicians that outlined the twenty three most important unsolved problems of mathematics, as he saw them. In "The Honors Class", Benjamin Yandell describes the problems and the very remarkable people who worked on them.

Recent activity: 7 years 6 months ago
by Hal Harris
Sun, 09/01/2002 - 01:00

I usually avoid writing in this space about materials that one might use directly in the classroom, since I am trying encourage teachers to expand their scope. However, this two -volume set recently published by the Royal Society of Chemistry is enough to make me change the rules.

Recent activity: 7 years 6 months ago
by Hal Harris
Thu, 08/01/2002 - 01:00

When nearly a dozen scientists, all in some way associated with research on biotechnology, die within a year of the 9/11 attacks, can it be coincidence? Yes, says Lisa Belkin, author of this excellent article on one of the constants of pseudoscience, the attribution of "cause" to random events.

Recent activity: 3 months 1 week ago
by Hal Harris
Mon, 07/01/2002 - 01:00

It goes without saying (amongst males, at least), that one can never have too many tools. Most of us probably have more screwdrivers than any other tool, both because of their utility and their high vapor pressure (like my reading glasses), and so one needs to buy more in order to make sure that one will be available when needed.

Recent activity: 7 years 6 months ago
by Hal Harris
Sat, 06/01/2002 - 01:00

The usefulness of the Internet for commercial and industrial purposes depends on the ability of individuals and companies to communicate privately, using an intrinsically public medium.

Recent activity: 7 years 6 months ago
by Hal Harris
Thu, 05/02/2002 - 02:00

An ideal companion to "The Universe in a Nutshell" is this article by Neil Ashby, a Professor of Physics at University of Colorado - Boulder. Hand- held GPS devices have become standard equipment for boaters, hikers, and technology junkies. It is now taken for granted that one's position on the earth can be obtained within a few seconds, accurately, and free.

Recent activity: 3 months 1 week ago
by Hal Harris
Wed, 05/01/2002 - 01:00

I was amazed at the popularity of Hawking's "A Brief History of Time" in 1998. Not because it was not a great book, but because the average reader's background in relativity, quantum mechanics, and cosmology is limited to their discussion in Star Trek.

Recent activity: 7 years 6 months ago
by Hal Harris
Mon, 04/01/2002 - 00:00

If the name "Simon Winchester" sounds familiar, it is probably because of his recent bestseller, "The Professor and the Madman", the history of how the Oxford English Dictionary was originally compiled. It is supposed to be very good, but I haven't had a chance to read it myself yet.

Recent activity: 7 years 6 months ago
by Hal Harris
Sat, 03/02/2002 - 01:00

This book is not politically correct, in an era in which school science experiments have been tamed to the point that there is little possibility that the teacher will kill or maim him/herself.

Recent activity: 7 years 6 months ago
by Hal Harris
Fri, 03/01/2002 - 00:00

Those of us who were fans of the old "Amateur Scientist" column of Scientific American will enjoy this collection of projects that look to be fun to build and to play with. These are all things that the author has invented or adapted for a Saturday Science Club for kids near his home in Guildford, UK.

Recent activity: 7 years 6 months ago