Blogs

ChemEd X contributors offer their ideas and opinions on a broad spectrum of topics pertaining to chemical education.

Blogs at ChemEd X reflect the opinions of the contributors and are open to comments. Only selected contributors blog at ChemEd X. If you would like to blog regularly at ChemEd X, please use our Contribution form to request an invitation to do so from one of our editors.

by Deanna Cullen
Fri, 04/19/2013 - 09:35

If you haven't seen them yet, check out the final release of the .

Recent activity: 1 month 2 weeks ago
by Deanna Cullen
Thu, 04/18/2013 - 18:46

Whether it is a completely unique idea or just a twist on an old classic, engage in collaboration with other chemistry teachers around the world and publish your work. There are many venues and the pool of precollege chemistry instructors that are already contributing is relatively small.

Recent activity: 1 month 2 weeks ago
by Doug Ragan
Tue, 04/16/2013 - 14:09

Moving from the computer lab to iPad? Then you need some apps. I have found two free apps that I use to replace computer-based gas laws simulations.

Comments: 1
Recent activity: 1 month 3 days ago
by Deanna Cullen
Sun, 04/14/2013 - 20:14

At NSTA (in beautiful San Antonio, Texas), this past week, I shared activities designed to explore three levels of representation AND provide formative assessment techniques to reveal student misconceptions. All of the activities shared have been featured in the Journal of Chemical Education or have been linked to research articles in JCE as supporting information.

 

Recent activity: 1 month 2 weeks ago
by Tom Kuntzleman
Wed, 03/13/2013 - 12:54

Have you seen the new Crayola Crystal Effects Window Markers? You can draw on windows with these markers. Better yet, you can use these markers to teach students some chemistry! After drawing on a window with these markers and waiting a little while, the marker ink appears to crystalize! Check out the video.

Comments: 9
Recent activity: 1 month 5 days ago
by Tom Kuntzleman
Tue, 02/26/2013 - 15:31

Have you ever cooked a marshmallow in a microwave? In case you are not familiar with this experiment, when a marshmallow is heated in a microwave, gases trapped in the marshmallow expand and escape. When the gas molecules escape from the marshmallow, they push against the marshmallow, causing it to expand. Check out the video.

Recent activity: 1 month 5 days ago
by Deanna Cullen
Mon, 02/18/2013 - 12:45

Moles, mole ratios and stoichiometry have been frustrating topics for many of my chemistry students. The MOLE and Avogadro’s number get tangled up in other Chemistry jargon and students have stared at me like I am speaking another language. I have been around long enough to know this is a problem that many of us have faced. I have tried many ideas that have helped and I want to share a few. 

Comments: 1
Recent activity: 1 month 3 days ago
by Doug Ragan
Fri, 02/08/2013 - 22:24

Allow me to introduce myself, my name is Doug Ragan and I have been a high school chemistry teacher for fourteen years.  Three years ago, I was approached by my high school principal and the conversation went like this,

Principal:  "You are one lucky guy."

Me:  "Really, why?"

Comments: 2
Recent activity: 1 month 3 days ago
by Tom Kuntzleman
Sat, 02/02/2013 - 11:13

You may have read Sarah Kong's recent on inquiry on this site.  I thought I would give a description of one way I incorporate inquiry learning into one of the chemistry courses I teach. 

Comments: 3
Recent activity: 1 month 3 days ago
by Sarah Kong
Tue, 01/22/2013 - 17:17

Who is Sarah Kong and why is she starting a blog for Chem Ed X about Inquiry?

Comments: 4
Recent activity: 1 month 2 weeks ago