Chemistry Teacher Tips and Tricks

Google Forms as an Assessment Tool

This school year my district is launching a 1:1 Chromebook initiative. 6th and 9th graders will receive their Chromebooks next semester as part of the rollout. In the meantime, I continue to have access to my Chromebook cart from the Blending Learning pilot I participated in last school year. My goal is to incorporate even more tech use when appropriate; so far, I have increased Chromebook use in my classroom for things like warm up questions, EdPuzzles, and quizzes. My experience with quizzes has been especially interesting.

Representing Molecules

A quick search on Amazon for a package of 144 ping pong balls and a trip to the arts and crafts store for paint, magnets, and glue and I was ready to start making my own class set of model kits.

How I Obtained Lab Equipment - Hach Grant

Chemistry teachers face many challenges. One of those challenges is providing our students with the equipment and resources they need to be successful. Many teachers find themselves in schools that cannot afford to properly outfit their chemistry courses. That is exactly the situation I found myself in as a new teacher.

Expo Neon Markers

As the trimester comes to an end, I have the chance to reflect with my chemistry students and ask them about course likes and dislikes.  A major "like" that came out was the use of the Expo brand neon markers.  I had heard about their use from Brian Bennett @bennettscience and how well they show up on the black lab tables.

Student Recommendation Tips

Every year, high school teachers across the country are asked to write college recommendations for their current and former students. With today’s competitive college culture, and an ever-growing list of teacher responsibilities—how can we be expected to write 10, sometimes more, original college recommendations each year for our students? As a teacher who was just introduced to all of this two years ago, I’ve spoken with college recruiters, researched how and what to include within a recommendation letter, consulted with guidance counselors (who see the range of recommendations, confidentially), and, most importantly, spoken with veteran teachers who write recommendation letters. After putting together the results of everything that I have learned, I have developed the following set of tips and advice. So, whether you are a pro at writing recommendation letters and are just looking to keep your letters fresh or you are a complete novice, as I was not too long ago, I hope that my advice will be helpful to you.